Despair and hope for planet Earth: the Bible prophecies of Isaiah

In the midst of fear, anger and hopelessness, what can we trust in? What dare we hope in? How did we get here and what are things coming to? This ancient part of the Bible actually speaks to use today about questions of both responsibility and hope.

 

Written in the 8th century BC, “The Prophecies of Isaiah” is one of the largest ‘writing prophet’ books in the Old Testament part of the Bible. It describes the ministry and message of the Isaiah son of Amoz, which spanned four decades and the reign of four kings in Judah (and four emperors of Assyrica). Isaiah explores things of responsibility, guilt, despair, hope, goodness and worship. While it begins with the failures and fears of the people of Judah and Jerusalem, it quickly expands to encapsulate not just the nations of the ancient world, but ultimately the entire universe as it looks ahead to the end of this world and God’s promise of a new creation.

 

For those familiar with the Bible, the book of Isaiah could be described as ‘the book of Romans of the Old Testament’. It summarises the themes and theology of the Old Testament and spells out the truths of the gospel which are ultimately fulfilled in the saving work of Jesus Christ.

 

 

NB: The ‘Corruption, Reuke and Hope’, ‘Despair and Corruption’, ‘Eschatology in Isaiah’ and ‘Don’t Trust in Egypt’ audio was delivered at our at our Student Leaders Vision Day and Uni Fellowship Engage conference, addressing core members of our group. Because of this original audience, they may not contain as much contextual information and clarifying comments as our Citywide Gathering, Breakfast Sessions and Lunchtime Sessions.